Desmond Pack Sew Along

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 10 – Strap Hardware

We have arrived at the final step of the Desmond backpack sew along. This has been a ton of fun for me, and I’ll admit I’m a little sad to be concluding my first sew along for my first pattern. That being said, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the process, and I love seeing all of your packs coming along and taking shape. If you use Instagram, be sure to tag your photos using the hashtag #thedesmondpack. You can search the hashtag to see how other people are interpreting the pattern, and various construction photos that I’ve been posting.

We need to do a couple of things to our webbing and hardware to make the pack fully functional.

Roll top slides and clips

To make the backpack close, we need to install the snap hooks and slides. Feed the end of one of your roll top straps through a slide, then under and over the snap hook opening. The view below is of the top side of the strap.

webbing, slide, snap hook

Continue feeding the end of your webbing back through the slide over the first layer of webbing.

webbing, slide, snap hook

Repeat for both straps.

webbing, slide, snap hook

Here is the backside. Both layers of webbing are fed through one side of the slide. This is a little bit different than how a slide normally works, but this method allows for a simpler installation with less webbing.

webbing, slide, snap hook

Here is the completed front side.

webbing, slide, snap hook

This makes the roll top straps adjustable. I suggest using the pack for a while to see if the roll top straps are the right length for your individual needs. I’ve purposely built in a little extra length to these straps so that they can be shortened if necessary. You have the option of sewing a loop at the end of the webbing (image towards the end of the post) or leaving the end of the webbing flat. If you are using natural fiber webbing, sewing a loop is probably a good idea so that you can hide the raw end of the webbing. The ends of synthetic fiber webbing like the nylon I used can simply be melted with a lighter.

If you do sew a loop, note that you will no longer be able to remove the slide or snap hook without ripping out your loop stitching, so make sure they are installed correctly before sewing a loop at the end of the webbing.

O-Rings

O-Rings, lower straps

Bring the lower strap up through the back side of both O-Rings.

O-Rings, lower straps

Then bring the strap down in between the two rings and pull tight.

O-Rings, lower straps

Tension on the strap holds everything in place.

O-Rings, lower straps

You can shorten these lower straps if necessary.

webbing loop

Once proper strap length is established, fold over and stitch a loop in place at the end of each lower strap.

If using natural fiber webbing, for both lower straps and roll top straps, you can double fold the ends of the webbing 1/2″ and stitch in place, which will help hide the raw end of the webbing.

WE ARE FINISHED!!!

I greatly appreciate everyone who has purchased the pattern and has been following along. Finally releasing the pattern and seeing people enjoy the process of making their own backpack has been an amazing experience for me. So thank you for the support!

Just because the sew along is over, that doesn’t mean the fun has to stop 🙂 These posts will be up indefinitely to help anyone who wants to make the backpack in the future. The pattern is available in my Supply Shop.

Oh, and here is my finished pack!

desmond pack front

desmond pack backdesmond pack side

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 9 – Lining Attachment

We are getting close to finishing with Step 9 of the Desmond Backpack sew along! The exterior and lining get sewn together today and all of the hard work put in so far pays off in a big way. There is something so satisfying about putting the final touches on a project.

Lining Attachment

Leave the lining right side in (pockets will be on the inside). Turn backpack body (exterior) right side out (zipper pocket and strapping will be on the outside). Press open 1-2″ of side seam allowance at the top of the backpack body and lining. If you want to press open the entire seam allowance you can, but it isn’t necessary.

Place backpack body (exterior) inside lining, right sides together. Align side seams, side notches, and center front and center back notches. Pin lining to exterior.

lining/exterior seam

Stitch lining to exterior all the way around top of pack opening.

lining/exterior seam

Make sure to keep notches and side seams aligned, and make sure that the side seam allowances remain pressed open as they are stitched.

lining/exterior seam pressed open

Press the seam open all the way around the top of the pack.

Turn backpack right side out through the hole left open along the bottom of the lining.

exterior/lining pulled to right side

With the lining pulled out of the exterior, pin edges of bottom opening together and top-stitch closed from the right side along previously pressed under seam allowance.

lining bottom seam closed

If you don’t want visible top-stitching, you have the option of closing this seam by hand, but I would recommend machine stitching this closed. The seam is at the very bottom of the inside of the pack, and it will not be visible.

lining tucked inside

Place the lining back inside the exterior, and then press the exterior/lining attachment seam flat all the way around the pack from the right side.

exterior lining top-stitch

Edge-stitch all the way around the top of the backpack. Then top-stitch 1/4″ from edge-stitching line, creating two lines of stitching.

exterior/lining top-stitch

That’s all we are doing today. There is only one more step left, where we will deal with all of the straps and snap hooks. We are almost finished!

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 8 – Lining Construction

With this step we are putting the main lining pieces together. The directions and procedure are nearly identical to Step 6, where we sewed up the sides and bottom of the exterior of the pack. There is one small change in the back/bottom seam where we need to leave an opening to turn the pack right side out later.

Lining Assembly

lining corner seam

Fold the bottom corners of lining piece A right sides together so that the edges align. Pin in place. Sew the corners using 1/2″ seam allowance, stopping 1/2″ from the edge.

lining back bottom seam

With right sides together, pin bottom of lining piece B to bottom of lining piece A. Starting 1/2″ from the edge, sew in about 2″ on each side, leaving a portion of the bottom seam open (this opening will be required to pull the backpack body through the lining later).

lining back bottom seam, open

Here is another view. Each end of the seam is sewn in about 2″ on each side, and the center remains open.

lining side seams

With right sides together, pin the long sides of lining piece A to the long sides of lining piece B. Starting at the top of the lining, stitch sides together, sewing all the way to the edge of the fabric at the top and bottom.

Sew a second row of stitches for reinforcement on top of all of the seams from this step, leaving bottom opening in place.

lining_seam_pressed_open

Press open 1/2” seam allowance along bottom opening. I actually pressed open the seam before sewing up the long sides, but it shouldn’t really matter either way.

presed under seam allowance

Here is that back bottom seam from the inside (or right side of the lining) after the seam is pressed open. Again, photo taken and seams pressed open before sewing up the long sides, but the order doesn’t really matter that much.

Many bags will leave a portion of the top of the bag open to turn the right side out later. If that is your preferred way of working, you can do that with this backpack. I’ve decided to pull the bag through the bottom of the lining, which gives a very clean finish around the top of the pack. In the next step, we will be attaching the lining to the exterior, and pulling the pack through this bottom opening.

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 7 – Lining Pockets

With the exterior of the pack finished, it’s time to start working on the lining. Several of the same pattern pieces that we used for the exterior of the pack are also used for the lining. Since it essentially takes on the same shape as the exterior of the pack, the directions for completing parts of the lining are almost the same as the exterior construction, but with some small adjustments.

Lining Side Pockets

Finish all edges of lining pocket pieces E with an overlock or zig zag stitch.

side pocket hem

Fold over 3/8″ at the top of each pocket piece E to the wrong side of the fabric and press flat.

side pocket hem

Repeat, folding over and pressing another 3/8″ to the wrong side.

side pocket hem

Top-stitch folded layers down from the right side 1/4″ from folded edge at top of pocket.

side pocket seam allowances pressed under

Fold under 1/2″ seam allowance on the left side of one pocket piece, and 1/2″ seam allowance on the right side of the other pocket piece. Press flat to wrong side. Fold under 1/2″ seam allowance on the bottom of each pocket piece. Press flat to wrong side.

side pockets attached

Turn pocket pieces E so that the right sides are facing up. Align pocket pieces E with lining side pocket placement lines, and pin in place to right side of lining piece A. Pressed under side edges of pockets should be facing the interior of lining piece A.

Edge-stitch pieces E in place along the pressed under side and bottom of each pocket. Add a second row of stitches on top of first row for reinforcement. Reinforce top corner of each pocket using (Figure 2) in the pattern directions for reference.

Baste opposite side edges 1/4″ from raw edges.

Back Lining Pocket

Finish all edges of lining pocket piece F with an overlock or zigzag stitch.

back lining pocket hem

Following the same procedure as the side pockets above, fold over 3/8″ at the top of pocket piece F to the wrong side of fabric and press flat. Repeat, folding over and pressing another 3/8″ to the wrong side. Top-stitch folded layers down from the right side 1/4″ from folded edge at top of pocket.

back lining pocket seam allowance pressed under

Fold under 1/2″ seam allowance on left, right, and bottom edges of pocket piece F. Press flat to wrong side.

back lining pocket bottom seam

Turn pocket piece F so right side is facing up. Align pocket piece F with pocket placement lines on lining piece B. The sides of the pocket are cut at an angle and won’t align just yet, but make sure pocket piece F is accurately placed along the bottom placement line. Pin in place to right side of lining piece B. Pressed under bottom edge should be facing down.

Edge-stitch pocket piece F to lining piece B along the bottom edge first.

back lining pocket center seam lline

Then sew vertically along the stitch line to divide pocket piece F in half.

back lining pocket side seams

Bring each side of pocket piece F in line with the right and left side placement markings. Edge-stitch each side of pocket in place. The pocket will not lay flat, as the angled sides create some extra room in the pocket for thicker objects.

Reinforce top corners and center of pocket.

back lining pocket sides seams

Add a second row of stitches on top of first row for reinforcement on the sides and bottom of the pocket, as well as the center dividing stitch line.

That completes all of the lining pockets. On Thursday we will put the lining pieces together, and get them ready for attachment to the exterior of the pack. There are only two or three more steps after this one, so hang in there! We are getting closer to finishing the pack!

Desmond Backpack pattern available in the Supply Shop.

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 6 – Main Body Construction

I love getting to this point in a project. After all of the somewhat intricate work involved with constructing pockets and straps, we finally get to see the backpack take shape today as we sew the seams for the main body. This is the 6th step in my Desmond Backpack sew along.

Main body construction, Exterior

main body corner seam

Fold the bottom corners of exterior piece A right sides together so that edges align. Pin in place. Sew the corners using 1/2″ seam allowance, stopping 1/2″ from the edge. Stopping 1/2″ from the edge will make assembling the pieces that meet in the corner easier. These stitch lines create the sides of the backpack.

back bottom seam

With right sides together, pin the bottom of exterior piece B to the bottom of exterior piece A. Stitch piece B to bottom of piece A, starting and stopping 1/2″ from each end.

back bottom seam from inside

Here is what the back/bottom seam looks like from the inside.

backpack body side seams

With right sides together, and all straps to the inside and out of the way, pin the long sides of piece A to the long sides of piece B. Stitch the sides together 1/2″ from the edge, sewing all the way to the edge of the fabric at the top and bottom.

backpack body side seams

When sewing up the sides, back tack over the lower straps for reinforcement.

Sew a second row of stitches for reinforcement on top of all of the seams sewn during this part of the construction. Like the shoulder straps in previous steps, these seams will take on the weight of the contents of the pack, so we need to make sure they are strong.

backpack body side seams

This completes the exterior portion of the pack, and you can set it aside for now. Up next on Monday, we will start work on the lining. I hope everyone has a great weekend!

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 5 – Back/Straps

Today we are working on the back of the pack where all of the strapping comes together. It’s important to make sure the straps are adequately reinforced since they will be carrying the weight of the pack. Last time we left off after completing the shoulder straps.

Handle/Strap Attachment

With right sides together, align top edge of strap backing piece G with placement line on exterior piece B. Stitch pieces together 1/2″ from the edge of piece G.

exterior back and piece G

Press seam allowance down, toward the other side of piece G.

piece G seam allowance pressed downd

Fold piece G along fold line so that both long edges of piece G are touching. Press flat.

handle strap attachment

Cut a piece of webbing 12″ long for the handle.

Align webbing for handle on each side of center mark on exterior piece B. Edges of webbing should be touching each other at the center point. The bottom edges of webbing should rest against piece G. Baste in place 1-3/4″ from piece G.

(Optional: if using lightweight fabric, reinforce wrong side of piece B behind strap attachments with fusible interfacing.)

roll top strap attachment

Cut 2 pieces of webbing 20″ long for the roll top closure straps (22″ for natural fiber webbing, ends of webbing will be folded over and stitched down later to hide raw edges). For each closure strap, place piece of webbing directly next to each side of the handle (one on the right side, one on the left side of handle). The bottom edges of webbing should rest against piece G. Baste in place 1-3/4″ from piece G.

Shoulder Strap Attachment

The shoulder straps are placed face down (webbing to the right side of fabric) to the right and left of the roll top straps. The cut angle should be parallel with, and should be resting against the edge of the webbing for the roll top strap, right and left side respectively. Non-angled corner of strap should rest against piece G. Baste in place 1-3/4″ from piece G.

shoulder strap attachment

Starting at basting stitches, stitch 5 reinforcement stitch lines (1/4″ apart) through each shoulder strap, roll top strap, and handle. Reinforcement stitch lines should be between basting stitches and bottom of piece G.

Press piece G up towards straps to cover reinforcement and basting stitches. Press flat.

piece G edge-stitch

Edge-stitch piece G to exterior piece B along top edge. Over each shoulder strap, roll top strap, and handle strap, edge-stitch an additional 5 lines of close reinforcement stitching. Stitch through piece G, the straps, and exterior piece B. Edge-stitch bottom of piece G.

finished shoulder straps

Your completed upper strap area should look like this.

Lower Straps

Cut two pieces of webbing 21″ long (23″ for natural fiber webbing, ends of webbing will be folded over and stitched down later to hide raw edges).

Place each piece of webbing within lower strap placement markings on exterior piece B. Align bottom corner of webbing with edge of fabric. The other corner of webbing will be overhanging edge of piece B. Mark a stitch line on webbing parallel to edge of piece B 1/2″ from the edge.

(Optional: if using lightweight fabric, reinforce wrong side of fabric behind strap attachment area with fusible interfacing.)

lower strap assembly

Sew webbing to fabric just inside stitch line using 5 lines of close stitching. Move over 1/4″ towards edge of fabric and sew another 5 lines of close stitching parallel to the first within the seam allowance. This webbing attachment area needs to be reinforced to handle the weight of the backpack.

Up next on Thursday, we will be assembling the exterior of the pack. Since I am taking my time with these sew along posts, and spreading them out over several weeks,  you still have plenty of time to grab a pattern and sew along!

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 4 – Shoulder Straps

Hey y’all, it’s step 4 of the Desmond Backpack sew-along!

You might want to check out #thedesmondpack hashtag on Instagram. Some cool packs are starting to show up! I love seeing the different fabric choices and interpretations of the pattern. If you need a refresher from where we left off last time, you can check out Step 3. At this point, all of the pockets on the front/sides of the pack (exterior piece A) should be complete.

Shoulder Straps

If you like your shoulder straps to have a little padding, now would be the time to think about adding some. My personal opinion for a pack of this size and purpose is that padding isn’t a necessity. I don’t plan on carrying heavy objects, and don’t plan on walking really long distances with the pack. My straps will be made as written in the pattern, with no extra padding.

That being said, thin foam or batting are probably the best options for adding padding to the straps if you choose to do so. Depending on what type of material you use, you might need to adjust the seam allowances to account for the extra thickness. Also, have your padding material prepared before you sew the straps together. Thin foam could be inserted after the straps are sewn and turned, but batting should probably be basted in before sewing and turning the straps. If you add padding, be sure to leave the top 2″ of strap padding-free.

Pin two strap pieces H with right sides together and stitch, leaving tops (straight ends) open.

Repeat for other two strap pieces H. Trim seam allowances on bottom curves to 1/4″ (clip curves if desired), but leave side allowances at 1/2″ and press seams open (the extra seam allowance adds structure to the straps).

strap seam

Turn straps right sides out so raw edges are concealed inside. Press straps flat from the right side, making sure to keep seams straight and aligned with the edge of straps. Starting at the top, edge-stitch all the way around each strap.

strap topstitching

Cut two pieces of webbing 21″ long. If using synthetic fiber webbing, melt each end of webbing to prevent fraying. Align webbing, centered at the top of the strap, and edge-stitch in place. There should be about 1/2″ of strap on each side of the webbing. Stitch all the way to the bottom of the strap, across the webbing, and back up the other side.

strap webbing attachment

I changed the color of my thread to match the webbing so that the stitching wouldn’t show on the right side.

strap ends before O-Rings

Place two O-Rings over bottom end of webbing, and fold remaining webbing to other side of strap. The end of the webbing should come up the back side of the strap by about 1-1/4″. The O-Rings should move freely, but there should not be too much slack or extra room in the webbing.

Feel through the strap to make sure top layer of webbing is lined up with folded under bottom layer of webbing. Stitch across bottom end closest to O-Rings with 5 rows of close stitches, starting and stopping at edge of webbing. Cut threads.

(note: O-Rings are not the only option here. D-Rings can be substituted, or plastic or metal strap adjusters can be used too)

strap x pattern

Sew an X-Pattern through all layers of webbing and strap following the numbers in (Figure 12) in the pattern instructions. Start sewing at #1 and sew to #2, stopping at each number with the needle down, and pivoting to sew towards the next number. If you are using natural fiber webbing, the top line of stitching in the X-Pattern should be fairly close to the raw end of the strap on the back side. This line of stitching should prevent further fraying.

Repeat for the other strap.

straps finished front sides

Here is the finished front side of the straps.

finished back of straps

Here is what the back side should look like.

Lay each backpack strap with sewn on webbing facing up. Dedicate one strap as the right strap, and the other as the left strap. At the top of the straps, on the inside of each strap, measure down 1-1/8″ and make a mark.

For wide to medium shoulders, measure across the top of the strap 3/8″ and make a mark. For narrow shoulders, measure across the top of the strap 1/4″, and make a mark.

Draw a line connecting the two marks, then cut along the line, creating an angle at the top of each strap.

finished top of straps

This cut will allow the straps to be set at an angle, giving a more comfortable fit and even weight distribution as the straps lay over the shoulders.

That’s all for today! We are taking it nice and slow. Next up, we will finish all of the straps including the handle, roll top straps, and lower straps.

Buy the pattern for the Desmond Pack in my Supply Shop.

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 3 – Front Zipper Pocket

I hope everyone had a great weekend! This is the third step in my Desmond Backpack sew along. Picking up where we left off last week, we are going to continue construction on the exterior of the pack and make the front zipper pocket. If you need to look back at the previous two steps, you can see them here: Step 1, Step 2. The pattern is available in my Supply Shop for anyone who wants to join in the fun. Let’s get sewing!

Front Zipper Pocket

Cut two pieces of webbing 4″ long. If using synthetic webbing (nylon, polypropylene, etc.), melt each cut end of webbing to prevent fraying. Don’t worry if you are using natural fiber webbing. The frayed edges will not be visible on the outside of the pack. You could always run a line of stitching (using a short stitch length) very close to the ends of your webbing as a safety stitch to keep the webbing from unraveling further. Do this before sewing the steps in this post. The ends of the webbing will be concealed under the zipper pocket.

Fold each piece of webbing in half over a D-Ring. Place each piece of folded webbing within D-Ring placement markings on right side of exterior piece A. Baste in place 1/4″ from edge of webbing. (Optional: if using lightweight fabric, reinforce wrong side of fabric behind D-Ring attachment area with fusible interfacing.)

D-ring placemnet

Finish all edges of pocket pieces C and D with an overlock or zig-zag stitch.

zipper pocket seam

With right sides together, sew top of piece C to bottom of piece D using 3/4″ seam allowance with the following stitch length adjustments: From the edge of the fabric to the first zipper end mark, sew with normal (around 2.5) stitch length and backtack where indicated in the pattern directions. Between zipper end marks sew with long basting stitches (above 4). From the last zipper end mark to the other side of the fabric, sew again with normal stitches, backtack/back stitch at zipper end mark. Press seam open.

zip pocket pressed open seam

Center zipper between zipper end marks aligning zipper stops with end marks, right side down, on top of seam. The zipper pull can be oriented in either direction depending on personal preference. Pin in place. I actually used little clips to hold my zipper in place. Sometimes pins can distort the zipper tape too much.

zipper stitch

Stitch zipper tape in place 1/4″ from center of zipper teeth on each side of zipper. Stitch from one zipper stop to the other zipper stop, leaving ends of zipper tape free.

Turn pocket to right side. Feel through the layers to locate the zipper stops, and using chalk or fabric safe marking pen, mark across zipper stops on right side of pocket pieces C and D. Sew 5 lines of close straight stitching (like a back tack) (or use a bar tack) through the right sides of pieces C and D, catching the seam allowance and zipper tape below. Start and stop stitching at stitch lines created when attaching the zipper. Be careful not to hit the zipper stops.

Here is what the backside should look like.

zipper pocket back

And the front side.

zipper pocket front

Remove basting stitches between zipper end marks.

zip pocket corner

Turn pocket to the wrong side. Fold each corner cutout so right sides are together, and sew each corner using 1/2″ seam allowance, stopping 1/2″ from the bottom.

zip pocket seam allowance

Using a ruler as a guide, press under 1/2″ seam allowance all the way around the pocket to the wrong side. Press open corner seam allowance as much as possible, distributing evenly on either side of the seam.

zip pocket corner seam

A close up of what the corner looks like. Tip: if working with extra thick fabric, trim extra bulk out of corners if it helps with positioning and attaching the pocket.

zipper pocket attachment

Place front zipper pocket within placement markings on right side of exterior piece A. Pin in place if necesary. Starting along top edge, edge-stitch top edge of pocket in place from one corner to the other. Do the same for the right and left sides of the pocket. This will help keep the pocket square and in place.

Tip: If working with extra thick fabric, rather than sewing from corner to corner, start sewing from the middle out to the corners. Sometimes it is easier for a presser foot to sew into a thick area, rather than start on top of one.

pocket attachment

Tuck corner seam allowance inside as you sew. Then edge-stitch the bottom of the pocket using placement lines as a guide. Add a second row of stitches on top of the first row all the way around the pocket for reinforcement.

d ring attachment

With D-Ring pushed to the top of webbing loop, sew 5 rows of close straight stitches through both layers of webbing and exterior piece A across bottom of D-Ring. Start stitching on the right side of the D-Ring, and stop with the needle down on the left side of the D-Ring after the 5th row of stitching. (Moving the needle, or using a narrow presser foot might be helpful for this step to get closer to the D-Ring).

With needle down, and referring to (Figure 9) in the pattern directions, pivot at #1 and sew to #2. Follow the numbers in (Figure 9) to sew an X-pattern, stopping at each number with the needle down, and pivoting to sew towards the next number.

finished_d_ring

The stitches are hard to see with my matching thread color, but hopefully you get the idea. Repeat for other D-Ring.

finished zipper pocket

Here is what the front zipper pocket should look like at this point. Now the front (and sides) of the exterior of the pack are complete. You can set this aside for now. Thursday we will start work on the back of the exterior of the pack, which includes all of the straps.

Feel free to get in touch if you have any questions about the pattern or sew along.

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 2 – Exterior Side Pockets

The sewing begins! If you haven’t already, you might want to look over Step 1, which dealt with assembling your pattern, choosing fabric and hardware, cutting out your fabric, and marking all of the placement and construction lines. Also, if you are sewing along and use Instagram, I’m using the hashtag #thedesmondpack for some of my construction images. Feel free to tag your pics as you make your packs. I would love to see what you come up with!

Today we will be starting construction on the exterior of the pack, specifically the side pockets.

Tips and things to keep in mind:

Throughout the sew along, I am using the “wrong” or reverse side of my denim as the “right” side. Just a reminder so there isn’t any confusion as to why I’m not using the typical dark side of the denim as my right side.

Seam allowances throughout the pattern are 1/2” unless otherwise noted. The pockets use both 1/2” and 3/4” seam allowances, and the pattern pieces are marked to show where to use a 3/4” allowance. Other than a couple of places, it really isn’t necessary to trim seam allowances like you might when making a garment. For the most part, the extra seam allowance will add a little structure to the seams, which is nice for a pack like this one.

Any place I mention edge-stitching, I’m stitching 1/16″ from the edge of the fabric. If you don’t like getting that close,  1/8″ from the edge of the fabric will work.

Side Pockets

serging edges of side pockets

Start by finishing all edges of exterior pocket pieces E with an overlock or zig-zag stitch. I’m using a serger on mine, but a tight zig-zag stitch will work just as well. These edges will be tucked inside the pockets anyway, but I like to have them finished so they don’t fray as you take objects in and out of the pockets.

zig zag stitch

Alternative zig-zag stitch along edges of pocket pieces E.

finished edges

Finished edges of both pockets.

first step of pocket hem

Fold over 3/8″ at the top of each pocket piece E to the wrong side of fabric and press flat.

second step of pocket hem

Repeat, folding over and pressing another 3/8″ to the wrong side.

pocket top-stitch hem

Once you have a nice flat edge, top-stitch the folded layers down from the right side 1/4″ from folded edge at top of pocket.

pressed under seam allowance

Next, fold under 1/2″ seam allowance on the left side of one pocket piece, and 1/2″ seam allowance on the right side of the other pocket piece. Press flat to wrong side. Don’t worry about the bottom edge and other sides of the pockets. These edges will be concealed inside the pack later.

pinned pocket

Turn pocket pieces E right sides facing up. Align pocket pieces E within exterior side pocket placement lines and pin in place to right side of exterior piece A. The pressed under side edges of the pockets should be facing the interior of piece A.

edge stitching pocket in place

Edge-stitch pocket pieces E in place along the pressed under side of each pocket. Add a second row of stitches on top of first row for reinforcement.

pocket corner reinforcement

Then reinforce the top corner of each pocket as shown above.

Lastly, baste the bottom and opposite side edges to exterior piece A 1/4″ from raw edges.

side pockets exterior

Here is what the finished side pockets should look like at this point.

That’s it for this step! We are starting out slow, but will be taking on the front zipper pocket on Monday.

Back to Step 1.

 

 

Desmond Backpack Sew Along Step 1 – Prep work

Welcome to the first step of the Desmond Roll Top Backpack sew along! We won’t be doing any actual sewing until Thursday, but there are some initial things to take care of before we begin.

First up, make sure you have your pattern! :).  The pattern is available in my Supply Shop.

For help with printing and assembling the pdf pattern at home, I have a guide to assist with that process.

Once you have your pattern, the next step is to decide on fabric and hardware. The pattern calls for 1 yard at 60″ wide of exterior fabric (the outside of the backpack). I recommend using a medium to heavy weight woven fabric, a 10oz cotton canvas for example, or a bottom weight woven. Lighter weight fabrics should be interfaced with medium weight fusible interfacing.

If you want to use something lightweight without interfacing, a nylon Cordura would work nicely. Cordura can be light but still very strong and durable.

The lining requires 1 yard at 45″ wide. I recommend using a medium weight woven fabric like 7 0z – 10 oz cotton canvas, or a bottom weight woven. Again, lighter weight fabrics can be used, but they should be interfaced with light to medium weight fusible interfacing.

denim and canvas

For the sew along, I am using the reverse side of denim for my exterior, and some natural canvas for the lining. One of the things I love about making bags and backpacks is that there are lots of options for fabric. Heavier apparel fabrics will work, as will home decorating and outdoor options. The sky is the limit!

I am washing my denim and canvas (separately) several times before I start sewing. The denim has a lot of starch, and I don’t want the dark blue side to bleed if the pack were to ever get wet. If necessary, wash your fabric before cutting and sewing.

desmond backpack hardware

Next, we need to talk about hardware. Here are the requirements:

• (2) 1″ snap hooks
• (2) 1″ D-rings
• (2) 1″ slides
• (4) 1″ O-rings (D-Rings can be used in place of O-Rings)
• (4) Yards 1″ wide medium-weight webbing (If using natural fiber webbing, get an extra 6″)
• (1) 9″ zipper

I have two hardware kits in my Supply Shop. One has all of the above hardware, the zipper, and webbing. The other option is just the hardware if you want to choose your own zipper and webbing colors. Obviously you don’t have to buy my kit to make the pack, but I thought it would be nice to put everything in one place. You can save a $1.00 on the pattern by purchasing the pattern with a hardware kit.

If you would rather use side release buckles or a different type of clasp for the roll top straps, that is perfectly fine. You can also use other types of strap adjusters for the shoulder straps instead of O-Rings. I like the “old school” look and feel of simple metal rings and snap hooks, but that’s just my personal preference. Feel free to use whatever type of hardware you like best. There are lots of places to purchase hardware online. I’ve had good results from Strapworks and Pacific Trimming.

You don’t need any special tools for this backpack other than your sewing machine and a zipper foot. If your machine has the ability to move the needle left and right, then you might not even need the zipper foot. Speaking of needles, make sure you have the appropriate needle size and type for your fabric. I’m using a size 18 denim needle.

tools for sew along

Here are a few things that I like to have on hand when sewing the Desmond backpack, or anything really. Rulers- great for checking seam allowances and making marks for placement lines. Straight pins- for holding pieces together temporarily. Chalk- my preferred method for marking lines and notches. Always check to see if the chalk will come off of your fabric. Scissors- one for clipping threads, another for trimming seams and/or cutting fabric. Seam ripper. Iron/ironing board.

Using a serger is optional. There are some places in the pattern that will need some type of overcast stitch, but a zig-zag stitch on a regular sewing machine will work just fine.

Once you have your pattern printed, assembled, and the individual pattern pieces cut out, it’s time to cut fabric. Please note that several of the pieces are used more than once for the exterior of the pack and the lining.

rotary cutter, washers as pattern weights

I usually use a rotary cutter with big washers as pattern weights. Use whichever method you prefer to cut patterns.

hold punch for placement lines

I love using a small hole punch for placement lines. If you punch holes on the inside of the lines like I did, make sure to actually draw your lines on the outside of your marks.

chalk for marking placement lines

Using your method of choice, (removable chalk/pencil/ink) transfer all placement markings, notches, stitch and fold lines to the right side of your fabric. Only mark exterior placement lines on exterior pieces, and lining placement lines on lining pieces. These placement lines are marked exterior or lining on the pattern.

Alright, that’s it for this first step! Thursday we start sewing the side pockets on the exterior of the pack.

My plan is to post two steps per week for the sew along. For some people that might be too slow, for others that might be too fast. I’m trying to find a happy medium. If you can’t stay on schedule, don’t worry, as these posts will be up indefinitely to assist anyone who makes the pack in the future. If you want to sew ahead, that’s fine too! For anyone who follows me on Instagram, I will be using the hashtag #thedesmondpack for any related posts there. Feel free to tag your pictures as we sew along.

Desmond Roll Top Backpack pattern available in the Supply Shop.